Snowball Cookies

Yummy crunchy snowball cookies!

SNOWBALL COOKIES

They are very tasty, and I made them by myself with Mommy.  The cornmeal makes the especially crunchy, too!

INGREDIENTS

  • 3/4 cup (1-1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/4 cup unsifted confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/3 cup sugar (we use light brown sugar)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/3 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour (we use fresh-ground whole-wheat flour)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

confectioners’ sugar, for finishing cookies

snowball cookies before baking.jpg

INSTRUCTIONS

Adjust rack to lower third of oven and preheat oven to 350°F.

Cream the butter, sugars, and vanilla until smooth.

In a separate bowl, mix together the cornmeal, flour, and salt.  Combine dry ingredients with butter mixture to form a soft dough.

Shape into 1-inch balls (using about 1-½ teaspoonfuls of dough per cookie), and space about 1-½ inches apart on large, parchment-lined baking sheets.  Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until bottoms are lightly colored.

While cookies are still warm on the baking sheets, sprinkle them with confectioners’ sugar through a small sieve. 

snowball cookies in tin

YIELD:
About 3 dozen.

 

Monsters of the World: Behemoth

Mightiest of all: The Behemoth!

According to Dr. Ernest Drake, the mighty behemoth is found only in the remote northen parts of Siberia, Canada, and Greenland.  This oversized mammoth is so huge that it must hide itself behind mountains instead of tall trees.

A behemoth looks much like a elefant.

Behemoth

Here’s Looking At You, Kid!

Did you know that Tettigoniidae go all the way back to the Jurassic period?

Did you know that Tettigoniidae go all the way back to the Jurassic period?  Well, I spotted one today, a long-horned grasshopper, commonly known here as a katydid (because when they call, they seem to say “Katy did, Katy didn’t!”).  He was sitting by the house singing, and we took a video of him because you can see his wings rubbing together, making his song.

But when we took the video, there came a caterpillar floating by on a string and the katydid just swept him up with his long horns lightning-fast, and ate it!

To be a bit more precise, this appears to be a Scudderia septentrionalis, a Northern Bush Katydid, a genus of katydids that live in the USA, primarily south in the Appalachians and in the upper Midwest.

Now, I talked to this one, and he told me that he has seen an Allosaur when he was still a little nymph.  His name, he says, is Leafy, and he is a thousand years old, but I doubt he is very good at counting…

green bush cricket featured

 

Dragons of the World: Tunguska Dragon

The mighty Tunguska dragon, also known as the War Dragon, originates from the Siberian wastes of Eastern Europe.

A subspecies of the common European dragon, the mighty Tunguska dragon, also known as the War Dragon, originates from the Siberian wastes of Eastern Europe.

Always black in color, these dragons are no longer found in the wild, having been domesticated by humans and bread over the centuries for use in war.  Their brute strength and considerable stamina, coupled with a generally dull-wittid sensibilty, unfortuntaley make them ideal for this purpose.

tungustka-dragon-2-e1531494284334.png

Source: Drake’s Comprehensive Compendium of Dragonology, p. 11.

Monsters of the World: Baku

According to legend, the shy baku, also called dream-eater, can devour nightmares.

The baku can be found on the coasts of continental Asia and around Japan.  According to legend, the shy baku, also called dream-eater, can devour nightmares.

baku

In reality, this taipir-like creature, which has a trunk similar to an elephant’s, has a soothing effect on people, much like the effect that stroking the fur of a cat has.

 

Monsters of the World: Six-Legged Salamander

Salamanders come as two-, four- and six-legged species, or so it would seem.

Exclusively found in active volcanic reginos, the six-legged salamander exudes a venomous milk that can extinguish flames.  Its third pair of legs may have originally evolved from wings.

Salamander Featured

In appearance, only the number of legs separates this salamander species from the common salamander.

In the featured image, you can see a two-legged salamander, yet another wondrous species.

Information mostly taken from Dr Ernest Drake’s Monsterology Handbook.

Monsters of the World: Chimera

At times, the chimera’s three heads do not see eye to eye.

The three-headed chimera is a lover of volcanic regions.  It breathes flame in the manner of a dragon from its goat-like head and attacks with venom from its snake-like one.  Its lion-like head has a vicious bite.  At times, the chimera’s three heads do not see eye to eye, both literrally and metaphorically.

chimera

Source:
Dougald A. Steer: Dr Ernest Drake’s Monsterology Handbook.  Somerville, MA  2009

Monsters of the World: Arabian Unicorn

The Arabian unicorn inhabits the remote mountain  and desert regions of Arabia.

Docile in the presence of girls but distrssed by boys, the Arabian unicorn inhabits the remote mountain  and desert regions of Arabia. Three other subspecies of unicorns have  been recordeed acrooss the  globe, which, despite appearances, are closely related.

PROMINENT features of the unicorn:

  1.  spiral horn in forehead
  2. billy-goatlike beard
  3. thick mane
  4. long neck
  5. lean, shaggy legs
  6. cloven hooves
  7. leonine [lionlike] tail

LAIR OR NEST:  None.

DIMENSIONS [ADULT]:  4 to 6 feet long; 3  to  4 feet high.

APPEARANCE:  Spiral horn; equine [horselike]; usually light in colour; smaller than often imagined; somtimes mistaken for a foal.

FORMS OF ATTACK: Horn, teeth, hooves.

FOOD:  Grasses, pomegranates.

 

Sources:

  • Dr. Ernest Drake’s Monsterology.  Somerville, MA 2008.
  • Dr. Ernest Drake’s The Monsterology Handbook.  Somerville, MA 2009.
%d bloggers like this: