Connie’s Baked Onion

Enjoy this episode of “Connie’s Camp Cooking” and glean various yummy recipes.

Lonnie and Connie from ‘Far North Bushcraft And Survival’ – they are located in Alaska – uploaded a campfire cooking video that we found both entertaining and informative.  Yesterday we tried the onion recipe and it turned out very delicious indeed.  Her sweet potato bread is next!

For her baked onion, Connie cuts the onion into wedges (as shown in the featured image), puts butter between the wedges and a bouillon cube in the middle, wraps and seals it all with aluminum foil and then just bakes it in the coals.  We did the same, but put the onion into the oven together with a bunch of oven potatoes and baked it all for an hour or so at 350ºF.

For the bread, Connie uses equal amounts of flour and cooked sweet potato (or pumpkin) mash and some salt, mixes it together until it can be rolled out or formed into patties, and then fries it in butter in a skillet.

But watch her do it, it’s much better than just reading about it.  And note her cobbler recipe that is printed in the video description.

Herbal Household Remedies: Mint

Most plants of the mint family have a wonderful fragrance and can be used in various ways. Check out this link to find out more.

Here is an interesting article on the OFA‘s website about mint and its uses.  If you have some in your yard, you know just how prolific all the mint family plants are.  Make use of them instead of fighting them as ‘weeds’!

12 USES FOR MINT LEAVES FROM HEALTH TO HOME

How do you use extra mint leaves? Here are 12 marvelous uses for mint around the home and garden—from culinary to medicinal to mouthwash to bug repellent!

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All images on this post are straight from the article we are linking to, only slightly edited

Link: Harbinger of Spring Look-Alikes: Dead Nettle & Henbit — The Herb Society of America Blog

Dead Nettle is just beginning to take off in the yard. Have a look at this great post about uses of it!

By Susan Belsinger

The first spring wildflowers, herbs, and weeds are popping out all over. Two that frequently appear together are both members of the mint family, Lamiaceae: dead nettle (Lamium purpureum) and henbit (Lamium amplexicaule).

via Harbinger of Spring Look-Alikes: Dead Nettle & Henbit — The Herb Society of America Blog

Disclaimer: The author of this blog is not an medical professional, nutritionist, or dietitian. Content on this website is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for legal or medical advice, or medical treatment or diagnosis. Consult your health care provider if you are experiencing any symptoms and before using any herbal product or beginning a new health regimen. When wildcrafting or foraging for plants, do so ethically; be accompanied by an expert; and always have absolute certainty of plant identification before using or consuming any herbs. By using any or all of this information, you do so at your own risk. Any application of the material provided is at the reader’s discretion and is his or her sole responsibility.

Herbal Household Remedies: Poultices

Our forefathers and -mothers knew full well how to use Mother Nature’s medicine cabinet.

A poultice is a raw or mashed herb applied directly to the skin, dry or wet.  Some herbs, grains or vegetables are better encased in a clean cloth before applying them.

Poultices are used to heal bruises, break up congestion, reduce inflammation, withdraw pus from putrid sores, soothe abrasions, or withdraw toxins from an area.  They may be applied hot or cold, depending on the health need.  Cold poultices and compresses are used to withdraw the heat from an inflamed or congested area, hot poultices to relax spasms and for some pains.

Here is a list of a few effective poultices that use either common kitchen items, kitchen herbs or weeds that can be picked just about anywhere.  If you research poultices a little, you will find that there are many more fairly common herbs that work well for poultices, so this list is really just an appetizer, so to speak.

garlic

Garlic: Known for its antibacterial action and drawing power.  Use it grated or boiled, added to milk and softened bread.  Apply bread as a compress to soak out poison or pus.

Marjoram: For liniment, use equal amounts of marjoram, thyme and olive oil for back ache, arthritis, sprain, muscle sores, bruises, rheumatism and the like. For a sore throat, a folded cloth dipped in a strong brew of marjoram and wrapped around the throat can relieve the soreness. (The featured image shows marjoram.)

Oatmeal: Apply hot, cooked oatmeal, encased in a clean soft cotton cloth, to relieve inflammation or help withdraw foreign objects.  Use for stings and bites.  It can be applied directly to the skin as well.

Plantain: Plantains is a common green weed.  Learn to recognize it, as it is invaluable in first aid medicine.  Apply mashed or crushed form on a cut, swollen sore or running sore, and wrap around finger for whitlow; attach with any clean cloth or bandage.  Throw away the pulp when it gets hot and apply fresh plantain to the wound.

plantain

Vinegar: Vinegar made from either blackberries, grapes or apples has a very healing effect on sprains, strains, sore throat, swollen glands and aching muscles.  Dip a folded cloth into such vinegar and apply to the body.  Attach with a clean bandage.  Fore sore throat, make a ‘double compress’:  First dip folded neck cloth into the vinegar and wring out.  Apply and pin so that no air enters.  Then take slightly larger woolen cloth or large wool sock and pin it over the first, wet bandage.  Make sure no air enters.  Fairly soon the throat will heat up from within, and the pain and congestion will be alleviated.


 

Disclaimer: The author is not an medical professional, nutritionist, or dietitian. Content on this website is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for legal or medical advice, or medical treatment or diagnosis. Consult your health care provider if you are experiencing any symptoms and before using any herbal product or beginning a new health regimen. When wildcrafting or foraging for plants, do so ethically; be accompanied by an expert; and always have absolute certainty of plant identification before using or consuming any herbs. By using any or all of this information, you do so at your own risk. Any application of the material provided is at the reader’s discretion and is his or her sole responsibility.

A Stuffed Pet Tornado

Be creative!

Well, here’s the result of our 2nd daughter’s newest creative outburst: a stuffed pet tornado for her sissy.

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Look, it’s a girl tornado, her name is Twisty and she is winking!

We also made a whale while we were at it, but that was the third daughter’s project.

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Say hello to this cute whale lady; her name is Whala.

 

Gingerbread Village

Knusper, knusper, knaeuschen, wer knuspert an meinem Haeuschen?

It’s not to late to make a gingerbread house for Christmas!  This year, we made a village of little houses rather than one larger house.  It was fun to make!  Here’s what you need:

Gingerbread Village

Ingredients

  • 1 box of Graham crackers
  • 1 bag of powdered sugar
  • juice of 2 lemons
  • small candy of you choice, such as ernies or skittles, sourpatch kids, mini candy canes, chocolate-covered pretzels, candied fruit slices, candy corn, mini marshmallows, reeses pieces, chocolate rocks and the like
  • some coconut flakes

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Directions

  • Cover a board, piece of plywood or spare baking sheet with aluminum foil.
  • Mix lemon juice and powdered sugar into a thick paste that serves as edible glue.
  • Break graham crackers in half.  From three halves, make a triangular hut with one half as the bottom, gluing the gable together and the roof onto the bottom graham cracker.
  • When you have made all the houses you want, arrange them on the board like you wish and decorate them and the space between them with your candy.  The thicker the glue, the less things will slide.
  • When you have decorated to your heart’s content, drizzle more runny glue over the houses for icicles (good to use up leftover lemon juice) or sprinkle with coconut flakes or powdered sugar for a snowy effect.

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Traditionally, gingerbread houses (or Knusperhaeuschen, as the Germans call them) belong under the Christmas tree on Christmas Eve or Christmas morning.  It’s not a bad idea to cover it when it is not used as decoration or being raided to keep it from getting overly dusty before it is all eaten.

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Make sure to polish it off during the 12 days of Christmas!

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Our Own Dear John Ronald: The Ultimate Artists

Ars longa, vita brevis? Not for the Elves.

Tolkien believed devoutly that there had once been an Eden on earth, and that man’s original sin and subsequent dethronement were responsible for the ills of the world; but his elves, though capable of sin and error, have not ‘fallen’ in the theological sense, and so are able to achieve much beyond the powers of men.  They are craftsmen, poets, scribes, creators of works of beauty far surpassing human artefacts.  Most important of all they are, unless slain in battle, immortal.  Old age, disease, and death do not bring their work to an end while it is still unfinished or imperfect.  They are therefore the ideal of every artist.

These, then, are the elves of THE SILMARILLION, and of THE LORD OF THE RINGS.  Tolkien himself summed up their nature when he wrote of them: ‘They are made by man in his own image and likeness; but freed from those limitations which he feels most to press upon him.  They are immortal, and their will is directly effective for the achievement of imagination and desire.’

Humphrey Carpenter: J.R.R. Tolkien: A Biography

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Perfectly Peculiar Putrid Party Punch

Happy Halloween!

This is a recipe I made.  (Note: This is not edible) It is called the Perfectly Peculiar Putrid Party Punch! Here is the recipe.

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Perfectly Peculiar Putrid Party Punch

Ingredients:

  • Colored slime
  • Water
  • Halloween odds and ends like googly eyes.

Directions:

  1. Put water and slime in a jar and let sit overnight.  Slime will dissolve and color the water.
  2. Stir in odds and ends.
  3. Put on table for decoration, and decoration only!
  4. Scare your guests!

Danish Butter Cookies

First time we used a piping bag. Fun!

Danish Butter Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 egg
  • 2 cups flour
  • Granulated sugar for sprinkling

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, beat the butter and sugar until combined and fluffy.  Then add the salt, vanilla and egg, and beat until combined.  Gradually add the flour and mix until the flour is incorporated.  The dough will be thick.
  2. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.  Have two baking sheets handy.  You can line them with parchment if you prefer.
  3. Transfer the dough to a decorating bag fitted with a large open star tip.  Pipe the dough into 2-inch circles on baking sheets. Sprinkle with sugar.
  4. Bake, one baking sheet at a time, until light golden brown, around 10 minutes, depending on your oven.
  5. Let the cookies cool for a moment, then transfer them to a cooling rack in a timely fashion.
  6. Let cool completely before storing.

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