Poesie: Keats’ To Autumn

Few poets produced more great poetry at an earlier age than John Keats.

This last of John Keats‘ six great odes was written on the day before the fall equinox in 1819, when Keats was 24 years old.  A child of the fall (he was born on Halloween 1795, which makes him a Scorpio), one can imagine why he made fall “the human season” in contrast with the super-human creativity of spring and the otherworldy extremism of summer and winter.  Being a child of the fall myself, I can understand him well.

Here’s to all who were born in the fall!

To Autumn

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run;
To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For summer has o’er-brimm’d their clammy cells.

Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reap’d furrow sound asleep,
Drowsed with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cider-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings, hours by hours.

Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,–
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The redbreast whistles from a garden-croft,
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.

John Keats (1795 – 1821)

insta maple leaves.jpg

Classical Sunday: Autumn

Enjoy the change of the seasons. Autumn is summer saying good-bye in its most glorious garment.

Autumn Classical Music

Telemann – Viola Concerto in G Major, TWV 51:G9: I. Largo 00:00
(Orchestra Sinfonica Warmia, Giovanni Antonioni, Silvano Frontalini)

Saint-Saëns – The Carnival of the Animals: XIII, The Swan 03:36
(Sarah Joy, Kathy Hohstadt)

Rachmaninoff – Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini: Var. XVIII 06:15
(Luke Faulkner)

Barrière – 6 Cello Sonatas: No. 4 in G Major: I. Andante 09:14
(Mr & Mrs Cello)

Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Concerto No. 3 in F major, RV 293 “Autumn”: I. Allegro 13:59 II. Adagio molto 18:49 III. Allegro 21:09
(Metamorphose String Orchestra, Yuliya Lebedenko, Pavel Lyubomudrov)

Bach – Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor, BWV 1008: IV. Sarabande 24:25
(Massimiliano Martinelli)

Puccini – Tosca: “Vissi d’arte” 29:06
(Orchestra Filarmonica Ucraina, Silvano Frontalini)

Beethoven – Symphony No. 6 in F Major, Op. 68 “Pastoral”: I. Awakening of cheerful feelings on arrival in the countryside 31:47
(Orchestra da Camera Fiorentina, Giuseppe Lanzetta)

Bach – Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major, BWV 1068: II. Air on the G String 42:39
(Otri Trio)

Corelli – Concerto Grosso No. 9 in F Major, Op. 6: I. Preludio. Largo 45:59
(Kiev Chamber Orchestra, Liviu Buiuc)

Litvinovsky – Suite for Strings “Le Grand Cahier”: I. La Foret et la Riviere 48:06
(Metamorphose String Orchestra, Pavel Lyubomudrov)

Beethoven – Bagatelle No. 25 in A Minor “Für Elise” (Cello Version) 50:52
(Sarah Joy)

Grieg – Holberg Suite, Op. 40: IV. Air 55:40
(Metamorphose String Orchestra, Pavel Lyubomudrov)

Liszt/Schubert – Ständchen (Serenade), S. 560, No. 7 1:01:12
(Vadim Chaimovich)

Beethoven – Piano Sonata No. 8, Op. 13 “Pathétique”: II. Adagio cantabile 1:07:00
(Luke Faulkner)

Chopin – 24 Préludes, Op. 28: No. 15 in D-Flat Major, “Raindrop”
(Vadim Chaimovich)

Debussy – Préludes, Livre 1, L. 117: No. 8, La fille aux cheveux de lin 1:18:49
(Rogerio Tutti)

Grieg – Lyric Pieces, Op. 54: No. 4, Nocturne 1:21:33
(Luke Faulkner)

Schumann – Kinderszenen, Op. 15: No. 7, Träumerei 1:25:09
(Vadim Chaimovich)

Chopin – Nocturnes, Op. 9: No. 2 in E-Flat Major, Andante 1:28:10
(Rogerio Tutti)

Mozart- Piano Sonata No. 16 in C Major, K. 545 “For Beginners”: II. Andante 1:32:25
(Carlo Balzaretti)

Tchaikovsky- The Seasons, Op. 37a: No. 9, September. The Hunt 1:36:18 No. 10, October. Autumn Song 1:39:22 No. 11, November. On the Troika 1:45:48
(Vadim Chaimovich)

Last Day of Summer

Enjoy the last day of summer.

It’s official:  Tomorrow, the Autumnal Equinox is upon us and summer is over for this year.  Enjoy the last day of summer therefore, and greet fall tomorrow.

fern and web featured

Cosmic events matter, you know.

grapes featured2

AUTUMNAL EQUINOX 2018: FACTS & FOLKLORE ABOUT THE FIRST DAY OF FALL 2018

It is the summer’s great last heat,
It is the fall’s first chill: They meet.

–Sarah Morgan Bryan Piatt

Like Coins Between a Dying Miser’s Fingers…

October turned my maple’s leaves to gold.

dandelion featured

Maple Leaves

October turned my maple’s leaves to gold;
The most are gone now; here and there one lingers;
Soon these will slip from out the twig’s weak hold,
Like coins between a dying miser’s fingers.

~  Thomas Bailey Aldrich

golden oak leaves featured

So, don’t trifle away the time allotted to you, esteemed visitor of this humble blog.

 

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