Cultured Wednesday: Sir Edwin Landseer

Sir Edwin Henry Landseer was a 19th century English painter and sculptor portraying mainly animals.

Inspiration can come from just about anywhere, I guess.  Today’s choice of painter was inspired by a feature in our Advent calendar:  They presented paintings from the National Galleries of Scotland, and among them was Sir Landseer’s “The Monarch of the Glen” (1851), one of the most famous British paintings of the 19th century.  We looked for more of his work, and our girls were very much impressed by his paintings of their favorite horses (Arabians, of course) and so many wonderful dogs.  Hopefully, you will enjoy our selection as well.

Portrait_of_an_Arab_Mare_with_her_Foal_by_Sir_Edwin_Henry_Landseer
Portrait of an Arab Mare with her Foal. Circa 1825

Sir Edwin Henry Landseer (7 March 1802 – 1 October 1873) was born, lived and died in London, UK.  He was an English painter and sculptor, portraying predominantly animals such as horses and dogs, but also wildlife, as shown above.  Developing his artistic talent very early in life, he is now probably best known for the bronze lion statures at the foot of Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square in London.  I firmly believe that every single tourist that ever went to London has a photo of these lions, usually with the tourist in question (and a couple of doves) in the picture as well; the lions’ shiny backs and paws provide ample proof of the innumerable people posing on and clambering around them day in, day out.

one of four lions at TS
One of the four lions at the base of Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square, London, UK, installed in 1867

Sir Landseer’s paintings of dogs in the service of humanity were very famous and influential in his day already, so much so that the name “Landseer” came to be the official name for a certain variety of Newfoundland dog, a black and white one, to be precise, because it was this variety Sir Landseer popularized in his paintings celebrating Newfoundlands as water rescue dogs, as seen below, for example:

Landseer_Saved
Saved, 1856

Sir Landseer did not only paint animals outside, but also in domestic settings.  Now follow four examples that are each very different, in atmosphere as well as choice of domestic scene, from the beginning of life through to its end.

A rural cottage scene:

Edwin_Landseer-_A_Highland_Breakfast
A Highland Breakfast, 1834

A more stately setting:

Sir_Edwin_Henry_Landseer_-_Favourites,_the_Property_of_H.R.H._Prince_George_of_Cambridge_-_Google_Art_Project
Favourites, the Property of H.R.H. Prince George of Cambridge, 1834 to 1835

An Eastern habitation:

800px-Edwin_Landseer_-_The_Arab_Tent_-_WGA12440
The Arab Tent, 1866

Another rural cottage scene.  Warning:  If you are as soft-hearted as I am, you might want to scroll on quickly.

1024px-Landseer_Edwin-Old_Shepherds_Chief_Mourner_1837
Old Shepherd’s Chief Mourner. 1837

Just in case you are still not impressed enough by Sir Landseer’s talent, or if you need a little cheering up, listen to this curious rumor:
Sir Landseer was reportedly able to paint with both hands, even at the same time!  He could, for example, paint a horse’s head with one hand, and, simultaneously, its tail with the other.  Amazing!

Sir Edwin Henry Landseer now rests in St Paul’s Cathedral, London, UK.

Lastly, the “Monarch of the Glen” in all its majesty:

The_Monarch_of_the_Glen,_Edwin_Landseer,_1851
The Monarch of the Glen. 1851

Breed Report: Colorado Ranger

The Colorado Ranger is a relatively new breed: the result of a breeding program aimed at producing a good cowhorse.

The Colorado Ranger is a relatively new breed: the result of a breeding program aimed at producing a good cowhorse.  Most of these very pretty Rangers have Appaloosa coloring, but, while many are double registered with Appaloosa breed societies, the Colorado Ranger is not a type of Appaloosa.

ORIGIN:  United States

ENVIRONMENT:  Open habitat including grassland, moor and heath

USES:  Riding and ranch work

HEIGHT:  14.2 to 16.0 hh (58 to 64 in)

COLORS:  Black, brown, dun, gray, bay and palomino

ORIGINS AND CHARACTERISTICS

In 1878, two stallions were given to General Grant by the Sultan of Turkey: an Arab called “Leopard” and a Barb called “Linden Tree”.  Two descendants of these stallions, “Patches” and “Max”, became the foundation stock of the Colorado Ranger.  They were bred to working mares on the ranges of Colorado, and their offspring were popular for their often striking spotted colors, agility, and intelligence.  Registered horses are directly descended from either Patches or Max, one and all.

If I had a horse like this, I would name him Sapphire Butterfly.colorado-ranger.jpg  

 

NOTES

The Colorado Ranger Horse Association, formed in 1935, keeps meticulous handwritten (!) records of the pedigree and coat pattern of each horse.

Source:
Debby Sly: Encyclopedia of Horses.  Bath, UK 2008, p. 207

Breed Report: Cob

 A recipe for a Cob horse: Irish Draft, Hunter, and sometimes even Shire horses, crossed with Thoroughbreds can result in a good stamp of Cob. 

A Cob is another anomaly that is not set breed but rather a type, despite the fact that it has easily recognized characteristics in much the same way as true breeds do.  The difference is that an infinite variety of crossbreeds can be used to produce the stamp of horse that is recognized as a Cob.

ORIGIN:  United Kingdom

ENVIRONMENT:  Open habitat including grassland, moor and heath

USES:  Riding, sports and carriage work

HEIGHT:  14.2 to 15.1 hh (58 to 61 in)

COLORS:  Black, brown, chestnut, gray, bay, palomino and colored

ORIGINS

A recipe for a Cob horse: Irish Draft, Hunter, and sometimes even Shire horses, crossed with Thoroughbreds can result in a good stamp of Cob.  The point of breeding a Cob was to produce a strong, sound, active, sensible, and not overly large horse that would be cheap and easy to keep while being adaptable enough to ride as a hack (meaning, a horse you ride for light exercise), or hunter, or to drive.

CHARACTERISTICS

Cobs are stockily built with a big body set on short, powerful legs.  They vary quite considerably within their recognized type:  Some are quite plain and perhaps a little too “roly-poly” in shape; others are really smart, with quality heads and powerful but active paces.  For showing purposes, a Cob should have bone and substance but also quality, and should be capable of carrying a substantial weight.  The head may be Roman nosed, but should be set on a crested neck.

cob.jpg

NOTES

A good Cob should be a very smart little horse with a jaunty, jolly character; good, low paces; and a powerful jump.  They make very popular hunters despite not possessing great speed.  They are comfortable, tough, easy to manage. and can usually take on a hedge with the best of them!

Not sure why, but I was unable to find images of Cobs that were not heavy horses.

Source:
Debby Sly: Encyclopedia of Horses.  Bath, UK 2008, p. 206

Breed Report: Cleveland Bay

The Cleveland Bay is a very attractive bay horse.

The Cleveland Bay is a very attractive bay horse.  Popularly used for carriage driving, he makes a very good hunter, and crosses with the Thoroughbred result for a good stamp of sports horse, particularly for showjumping.  The Cleveland Bay is always bright bay, which sets off the black “points” of his legs and and the mane and tail.

ORIGIN:  United Kingdom

ENVIRONMENT:  Open habitat including grassland, moor and heath

USES:  Riding, sports and carriage work

HEIGHT:  16.0  to 16.2 hh (64 to 66 in)

COLORS:  Bay

ORIGINS

The Cleveland Bay is believed to be Britain’s oldest breed, descended from a particular stamp of bay pack horses that were bred in the monasteries of northern England during the Middle Ages.  The bay horse they bred was used by travelling tradesmen and known as “chapmen”.  Thus the horse became the Chapman Horse.  In the 17th century, it was crossed with Barb, and Andalucian horses in some cases, resulting what we now know as the Cleveland Bay.

CHARACTERISTICS

The Cleveland Bay is an elegant horse with a level, free, long striding action that can be used for riding, carriage, and light draft work.  An active, elegant but very powerful horse, the Cleveland Bay is bold and honest, but he has a strong character, making him difficult if mishandled.

Cleveland Bay.jpg

NOTES

The 18th century was the golden age of carriage driving.  It was then that the Cleveland Bay was crossed with the Thoroughbred to produce the faster Yorkshire Coach Horse.  These exceptional carriage horses were exported all over the world.

The Cleveland Bay has no relationship to Cleveland, OH, or Cleveland Bologna, for that matter (and I like Cleveland Bologna).  Cleveland Bologna is not made of Cleveland Bay.  At least, I think so …

Source:
Debby Sly: Encyclopedia of Horses.  Bath, UK 2008, p. 205

 

Breed Report: Carthusian

The Carthusian is considered to be the purest strain of the Andalucian.

The Carthusian is considered to be the purest strain of the Andalucian and consequently is also known as the Carthusian Andalucian (and as the Carthujano).  Being one of Spain’s oldest breeds, it owes its purity to the work of Carthusian Monks, believe it or not.  Today, it is bred at state-owned studs in Cordoba, Jerez and Badajoz (all of them Spanish cities).

ORIGIN:  Spain

ENVIRONMENT:  Desert and semidesert, also open habitat including grassland, moor and heath

USES:  Riding and sports

HEIGHT:  15.0 hh (60 in)

COLORS:  Black, chestnut and gray

ORIGINS

The foundation Carthusian stallion was bred by the two Zamoras brothers who purchased an old stallion named El Soldada for their herd of Spanish mares.  It is said that one of the brothers recognized the stallion as his old cavalry horse!  The first colt they produced was the dark gray Esclavo.  He had a lot of offspring and, in 1736, a group of his mares were given to Carthusian Monks as settlement for a debt.  The monks, determined to protect their horses’ purity, even defied royal orders and refused to introduce outside blood.  The line they preserved became known as the Zomoranos.  In 1854, Don Vincent bought as many of the Zomorano line as he could find and continued to improve the breed, still without using outside blood.

CHARACTERISTICS

The breed is renowned for its conformation:  It has a fine head set on a muscular neck, and round, muscular quarters.  Its shoulders are sloping while its chest is deep, and its back short and broad.  The head is elegant and noble.  The mane is luxuriantly abundant.  A unique feature sometimes displayed in this breed is two small, horny growths, either on the temple or by the ears, as can be seen in the image below.

If I had a horse like this I would name it Silver Dragon.

Carthusian Featured

Source:
Debby Sly: Encyclopedia of Horses.  Bath, UK 2008, p. 204

Summer School

The Horse Course: Introduction to Basic Care and Management.

Don’t know how to keep your children busy on rainy days?  We just enrolled in this free online course at the University of Florida.

The Horse Course: Introduction to Basic Care and Management

There are over 100 million horses, donkeys and mules in the world today and owners of these animals can be found on almost every continent and in almost every society. The Horse Course will cover many unique aspects of equine ownership and touch upon the science behind many of today’s management practices.

The girls are very much looking forward to it!

 

A Chestnut Filly Named Regret

My favorite Kentucky Derby winner was named Regret.

My favorite Kentucky Derby winner was named Regret.  She was the first filly to ever win the Kentucky Derby!  That was in 1915.  The other two fillies that won The Kentucky Derby were called Winning Colors and Genuine Risk.

Regret featured

Regret became the first of only four horses to ever win all three Saratoga Race Course events for two-year-olds: the Saratoga Special Stakes, Sanford Stakes and Hopeful Stakes.  The following year she won the 1915 Kentucky Derby, her first race as a three year old, and became the first filly of three to do so.  This brave filly was also the first undefeated horse to win the Kentucky Derby, and had only three starts prior to the race. Retrospectively, Regret was named American Horse of the Year.

Out of 11 starts in four seasons (1914–1917), Regret won nine, and placed second in one. The only race she was not placed in was the 1916 Saratoga Handicap.  Throughout her racing career, she was never beaten by a female horse.

Regret was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in 1957.

By the way, the 2018 Run for the Roses was run on Saturday.  Have a look who won here.

Breed Report: Canadian Cutting Horse

Canada does not have any indigenous horse breeds, but it does have a thriving horse breeding industry.

Cattle ranching is a big business in Canada, still employing a large numbers of horses for ranch work.  And while the country does not have any indigenous horse breeds, but it does have a thriving horse breeding industry.  The Canadian Cutting Horse has evolved from this industry to meet the needs of the ranch owners.

ORIGIN:  Canada

ENVIRONMENT:  Mountains and open habitat including grassland, moor and heath

USES:  Riding and ranch work

HEIGHT:  15.2 to 16.1 hh (62 to 65 in)

COLORS:  Black, brown, chestnut, dun, gray, bay and palomino

ORIGINS

The main aim of the Canadian Cutting Horse Association is to promote the sport of cutting cattle, that is, separating a specified animal from a herd.  The Association does not have a closed studbook, so the bloodlines of this horse are not specified.  It is left to the horse to prove that he has the necessary attributes to cut cattle.

CHARACTERISTICS

Most Canadian Cutting Horses carry a high percentage of Quarter Horse blood.  In turn, the Quarter Horse evolved from the Spanish Horse, from which both these breeds inherit their ” cow sense”.  In cutting competitions, once the selected cow is split from the herd, the rider drops the reins and leaves the horse to “mark” the cow and prevent it rejoining the herd.  The horse’s agility, stamina, and intelligence enable it to outmaneuver a cow.

Cutting horse featured

NOTES

The well-proportioned head of the Canadian Cutting Horse is set on a gently arched neck.  The shoulders are sloping and powerful, the chest broad and deep, and the hindquarters immense and powerful.

Source:
Debby Sly: Encyclopedia of Horses.  Bath, UK 2008, p. 203

Breed Report: Campolina

The dark gray stallion “Monarca”, son of a black mare of Barb breeding and a pure Andalucian stallion, is considered to be the Campolina’s foundation sire. 

Cassiano Campolina began a breeding program in 1857 on his ranch in Minas Gerais, Brazil.  He wanted to produce horses with great presence yet with calm temperaments and comfortable paces.  The Campolina is gaited—as well as the usual paces it has an additional four-beat lateral gait.

ORIGIN: Brazil

ENVIRONMENT:  Open habitat including grassland, moor and heath

USES:  Riding, sports and ranch work

HEIGHT:  14.1 to 15.3 hh (57 to 63 in)

COLORS:  Black, brown, chestnut, dun, gray, bay, palomino and colored

ORIGINS

In 1870, the Brazilian horse breeder Cassiano Campolina bred a black mare of Barb breeding to a pure Andalucian stallion.  Their dark gray colt foal, named “Monarca”, is considered to be the Campolina’s foundation sire.  He served as a stallion on the ranch for 25 years, being bred mainly to Criollo mares.  Sr. Campolina also used a mix of other stallions to achieve his aims, including Anglo-Norman, Holsteiner, American Saddlebred, a part-Clydesdale and, to further refine the breed, the Mangalarga Machador.  In 1934, the studbook was closed and a Breed Association and breed standard was created in 1951.

CHARACTERISTICS

The Campolina has presence and substance.  He sports an attractive head with quite big ears and kind, dark eyes set on a strong and arched neck.  He has a full as well as silky mane – a sure indicator of Andalucian blood.  The croup is slightly sloped, and the hindquarters round with a lowset tail.

campolina4

NOTES

Campolina horses can be any color, but a great many exhibit the attractive dun coloring, evidence of the Criollo blood.  A dorsal stripe and zebra markings on the legs are also common.

Source:
Debby Sly: Encyclopedia of Horses.  Bath, UK 2008, p. 202

Breed Report: Budenny

Today the Budenny is in demand as a competition horse and racehorse.

During the 1920s, Russia went through a phase of creating new horse breeds to meet the demand of tough cavalry horses.  they used complex crossbreeding systems, and the Budenny was one result of these policies.  He was a horse of sufficient quality that he soon evolved into a popular competition horse.

ORIGIN:  Russia

ENVIRONMENT:  Open habitat including grassland, moor and heath

USES:  Riding, sports and racing

HEIGHT:  16.0 to 16.1 hh (64 to 65 in)

COLORS:  Black, brown, chestnut, and bay

ORIGINS

The Budenny resulted from the crossing of Don and Chernomor mares with Anglo-Don stallions.  Dons were the famous mounts of the Don Cossacks; the Chernomor was a smaller, lighter version of the Don.  The breeding program for the Budenny was based at a military stud in the Rostov region, and used the best mares and stallions as foundation stock.  The Budenny was recognized as a breed in 1949.

CHARACTERISTICS

The head of the Budenny should be well proportioned, full of quality, and set on a long, fairly straight neck.  The eyes are bright and intelligent, the ears sharp and alert.  Overall, the Budenny’s conformation is one of lean athleticism, but the shoulders are not as long and sloping as the Thoroughbred, while the hind legs can be relatively straight and weak looking.

Buddeny2

 

Source:
Debby Sly: Encyclopedia of Horses.  Bath, UK 2008, p. 199

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